Marijuana use is on the rise in the U.S., according to new research from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.  The study, which compared marijuana usage among adults from 2001 to 2013, found that usage more than doubled in recent years.

According the study, in 2001 only 4.1% of adults used marijuana, but by 2013 that number jumped to 9.5%.  Increased cannabis use also mirrors the shifting attitudes of Americans toward cannabis, with less than a third of Americans supporting the cannabis legalization in 2001, but more than half the country in favor by 2013.  Indeed, since 2012, four states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis for recreational use.

In conjunction with the increase in cannabis use, though, the study also found that marijuana abuse and dependence also increased over the 12 year time period.  Besides questions about usage, study participants were asked questions to determine if they experienced marijuana use disorder, ranging from whether or not they tried and failed to cut back on their usage; if marijuana had contributed to social or psychological problems; or if they had repeatedly driven while high.  However, the increase can likely be attributed to the overall increase in the number of adults who now use cannabis.

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