The changes under the bill sponsored by Sen. Ann Rivers, R-La Center, include reducing the amount of marijuana and the number of plants patients can possess, doing away with collective gardens and establishing a patient registry.

Rivers called the measure a framework and said it was “the very best attempt to protect our patients and their rights while making sure we meet Initiative 502 guidelines,” which legalized the recreational use of marijuana.

Under the measure that passed Saturday, collective gardens would be eliminated Sept. 1, 2015, meaning that unless current dispensaries receive a license from the state, they will have to close. But under the measure that passed Saturday, patients and designated providers could form cooperative marijuana-growing operations of no more than four participants.

The measure permits stores to have a medical endorsement to sell medical as well as recreational marijuana and allows an option for endorsed retail stores to solely serve medical-marijuana patients.

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